Design Teams

Headshot of Marc Rettig
Marc Rettig

Change the Story—and the Conversation

You’ll learn…

  • Why the right kind of conversations are the key to culture change
  • How to use “dialog interviews” to gain understanding and build relationships
  • How to gather teams with real legitimacy and affect your organization’s driving stories
  • How to reach consensus on what to make, what’s good, and where you’re going
Headshot of Tomer Sharon
Tomer Sharon

UX Luvs PM: 6 Ways to Learn Better Together

From Rosenfeld Media's Product Management + User Experience Virtual Conference.

UXers who practice user research and Product Managers have a lot in common. They both want to learn from users and customers and work hard toward developing successful products, features, or services.

However, sometimes they may feel disconnected from each other, perceiving one another as too slow, fast, biased, academic, disorganized, vague, and what not. During this talk, Tomer Sharon, author of It’s Our Research and the forthcoming Validating Product Ideas, will provide six practices—three for UXers, three for PMs—to work better together in researching users and their needs.

UX designers:​

  • Be there early to help Product Managers to Shape product roadmap 
  • Listen to PMs to identify knowledge gaps
  • Let PMs be: invite them to ask users questions


Product Managers:

  • ​UXers can make you heroes
  • Get feedback on your survey questions ​ ​
  • Customer meetings are a rare opportunity to learn​
Headshot of Chris Risdon
Chris Risdon

Using Experience Maps to Unite Teams

You’ll learn…

  • Visually capture what a holistic experience looks like for your product or service
  • Highlight the good, bad, and ugly of a user’s journey with your organization
  • Demystify data visualization so you can fold it into your work
  • Envision and communicate a more seamless experience for your customers
Headshot of Leah Buley
Leah Buley

Lean Methods for the UX Team of One

You’ll learn…

  • Self-document. As you’re working, you’re also creating the pieces that you need for the deliverable. Nothing is created that can’t be shared and used.
  • Discourage time wasted on perfectionistic polishing of deliverables. Lowest fidelity necessary.
  • Understand where 20% of the work will bring 80% of the benefit. Designed to help you prioritize.
  • Understand that lean methods are those that do one thing at a time and do it well—answer a question, communicate a concept, establish a next step. Bite sized and with a purpose.